Most of our top picks offer a slew of discounts, so be sure to check out each company’s available options. Typically, you’ll save money if you’re able to bundle your auto and RV insurance together. Some providers also offer discounts for having a membership to an RV club or completing RV training/safety courses. Additionally, many insurers consider you less of a risk if your RV is equipped with updated safety features like air bags, anti-lock brakes, and anti-theft devices. And remember: The fewer traffic violations you have, the lower your premium will be.

For our top picks, we preferred online claim reporting capabilities (including mobile app options) for customer convenience, but we also wanted companies to offer easy access to real human support. Whether you want to have another person on the line throughout the whole process or prefer to keep things digital, a good insurance company offers you plenty of options for claims.


Good Sam shows an outstanding number of positive reviews on Birdeye, a platform which the company uses in order to get first-hand customer feedback that is both relevant and reliable. On the platform, customer satisfaction relating to its products and services hovers at around 96%. The company is also accredited with the Better Business Bureau, where it currently holds an excellent A+ rating.
Meanwhile, the most expensive vehicle to insure side of the list is chock full of pricey and very high-powered cars. Once again, Mercedes is the big winner when it comes to the most costly vehicles to insure, with a total of seven models on our top 20 list. However, it was the Nissan GT-R that came out on top with a $ $3,941 annual insurance bill – and up $772 from 2014 when it also ranked at the top of the most expensive list.

So now that we understand the difference between auto and RV coverage, let’s take a look at the specifics of what you get under an RV policy. Essentially, RV insurance acts as a hybrid between car and home insurance, offering additional protection for home and living essentials through specialized coverage plans. Depending on the policy you choose, it may include:
While many companies require you to call in to file a claim, Allstate offers a myriad of options, so you can choose what’s most convenient for you. Whether you’re a registered Allstate customer or just using a guest account, you can file a claim through an online report, directly contact a local agent, or call in to the 24/7 customer service hotline.
Regardless of how often you use your RV, Safeco is worth a look. Safeco offers coverage for anyone who lives in an RV fewer than 250 days (about eight months). While this won’t cover policyholders who live in their RV full-time, it serves as a nice middle-ground for people who only plan to store their RV away during the winter months, for instance.
In addition, luxury cars come with high repair costs due to the quality of the materials used (teak wood is more expensive than plastic) and the fact that they are often loaded with the latest technology. “Sports cars and high-end luxury vehicles are almost always more expensive to insure because of repair costs. The materials used in these vehicles is often more expensive than the finishes in a moderately priced vehicle,” says Carole Walker, executive director with the Rocky Mountain Insurance Information Association
So now that we understand the difference between auto and RV coverage, let’s take a look at the specifics of what you get under an RV policy. Essentially, RV insurance acts as a hybrid between car and home insurance, offering additional protection for home and living essentials through specialized coverage plans. Depending on the policy you choose, it may include:
Companies also needed to offer full-timer coverage for those who live year-round in their RV; full replacement coverage in the event the RV is totaled or stolen; personal belonging coverage for the property inside the RV, including electronics, appliances, and jewelry; vacation liability coverage for injuries that occur at the vacation site where the RV is parked; and permanently attached items coverage for items like satellite dishes, wheelchair lifts, or retractable canopies. Finally, companies also were required to cover most, if not all types of recreational vehicles.
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